Cool Cargo: Teamwork Charter

Over Memorial Day weekend, Green Worldwide’s Miami and Houston branches worked together to charter a Boeing 767 Freighter to Panama – an oil tanker was in dire need of an additive for petroleum fuels. Our Houston office received the phone call Saturday morning at 10:45 Central that product was needed in Panama for Monday morning. By 2:45 PM we had the solution. No commercial aircraft would be able to meet the deadline so a charter solution was provided. To add a little twist, the cargo being Haz Mat had to be re-packed to comply with IATA regulations and we would need our Haz Mat packer to inspect and label prior to pickup. Continue reading Cool Cargo: Teamwork Charter

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Summer Internship Spotlight: Sales Intern Adante’ Aguilar

This summer, Green Worldwide Shipping is privileged to have some wonderful interns working hard to learn the ins and outs of the industry. We’ve interviewed them to find out all they have learned so far on their break from school. Sun, sand, and the shipping industry– what else do you need for a great summer?

Adante’ Aguilar is a rising senior at the University of Tenessee, where he studies Supply Chain Management and Marketing.  He works under Thomas Nolan, National Sales Director, as Green Worldwide’s Sales and Marketing Intern. Continue reading Summer Internship Spotlight: Sales Intern Adante’ Aguilar

Port Story: Port of Los Angeles

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Port of Los Angeles, also known as America’s Port, was established in 1907 and helped transform Los Angeles into the international trade center of today. While the Port was not officially founded until 1907, it had a 250-year-long history as a center of commerce stemming from California’s roots as a Spanish colony.

Throughout the early 20th century, the Port had an important economic role in not only the state economy but the national and global economy. By 1913, the Port served as the world’s largest lumber importer, used to satisfy the rapid development of the City of Los Angeles. By the 1920s, the Port had surpassed San Fransisco as the West’s busiest port.

The Port was home to the United Fruit Company and imported innumerable amounts of Bananas from South America, and Union Oil and Standard Oil companies, which were vital to the growth of the country’s oil industry. It was also home to the Great White Fleet, the cornerstone of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick diplomacy. Due to its logistical, economical, and political prominence, the Port of Los Angeles was crucial to the United State’s development of the Panama Canal. During World War II, the Port was a valuable shipbuilding resource, making massive contributions to the war effort, and employing nearly 90,000 people.

Today, the Port of Los Angeles comprises of 7,500 acres of land and water along 43 miles of waterfront. It features 27 passenger, cargo terminals, and warehouse facilities that handle billions of dollars worth of freight each year. Today, the Port of Los Angeles is the busiest port in the United States by container volume and the 19th busiest port in the world.

In 2002, the Board of Harbor Commissioners for terminal and ship operations programs targeted at reducing polluting emissions from vessels and cargo handling equipment as a part of a new sustainability initiative. Their sustainability initiative can be summed up in this quote from the Port of Los Angeles website:

The Port of Los Angeles is committed to promoting responsible growth and supporting innovative development. Utilizing the tenets of sustainability, the Port works toward the best interests of the community, environment, and economy. These principles are practiced through integral considerations during planning, design and construction, and throughout operations and maintenance of Port facilities and structures.

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below, or check out our last installment in the series. 

World Environment Day 2017

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Monday, June 5th is World Environment Day 2017, and Green Worldwide Shipping is excited to celebrate!

World Environment Day is the United Nations’ most important day for encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the protection of our environment. Since it began in 1974, it has grown to become a global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated in over 100 countries.

The theme for World Environment Day 2017, ‘Connecting People with Nature,’ implores us to get outdoors and into nature, to appreciate its beauty and its importance, and to take forward the call to protect the Earth that we share.

Green Worldwide is celebrating this World Environment Day by reaffirming our commitment to the UN Global Compact, and the sustainable business goals Green Worldwide is committed to achieving.

How can you celebrate World Environment Day?

Get outside! The World Environment Day website encourages the people of the world to get outside, go to a park, and interact with nature. They also encourage picking up 10 or 100 pieces of trash or joining local cleanup efforts. To learn more about World Environment Day events in your area, visit www.worldenvironmentday.global.

To find out more about Green Worldwide’s commitment to sustainability, check out our Earth Day blog or our blog about the UN Global Compact.

For more information on Green Worldwide and our company values, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story: Port of Houston

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While there has been trading along the gulf coast of Texas as long as anyone can remember, the official Port of Houston didn’t exist until the 20th century, making it one of the youngest ports in the world. Port of Houston would have never existed at all if it weren’t for Mother Nature.

In 1900, a massive hurricane hit the coast, becoming one of the worst natural disasters in American history. This convinced residents of Houston of the need for a deep-water port and President Woodrow Wilson officially opened the port to traffic as the World Port of Houston and Buffalo Bayou on November 10, 1914.

Port Houston was the first port to be built with federal funds and local matching funds, creating the requirement that every port in the United States since 1930 has had to meet. It was also the first port in the United States to see the first direct shipment of cotton to Europe and was the first port to meet ISO 14001 standards for environmental excellence, and the first port to be recertified to ISO 14001 standards.

Today, Port Houston is the busiest United States port regarding foreign tonnage and the second busiest port overall. It is a massive contributor to the Texas economy, with it providing over 1 million jobs in 2014 and having a statewide economic impact of $264.9 billion dollars. From Port Houston’s website: 

Port Houston’s economic activity helps keep Texas the nation’s top exporting state.  For the past 13 consecutive years, Texas has outpaced the rest of the country in exports.  In 2014, Texas exports totaled more than $289 billion, up from nearly $280 billion in 2013, according to annual trade data from the U.S. Department of Commerce.  The state’s exports outperformed overall U.S. exports, which only grew by 2.4 percent to $1.62 trillion in 2014 from $1.58 trillion in 2013.

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below, or check out our last installment in the series.