Port Story: Port of Los Angeles

Port Story- LA

Port of Los Angeles, also known as America’s Port, was established in 1907 and helped transform Los Angeles into the international trade center of today. While the Port was not officially founded until 1907, it had a 250-year-long history as a center of commerce stemming from California’s roots as a Spanish colony.

Throughout the early 20th century, the Port had an important economic role in not only the state economy but the national and global economy. By 1913, the Port served as the world’s largest lumber importer, used to satisfy the rapid development of the City of Los Angeles. By the 1920s, the Port had surpassed San Fransisco as the West’s busiest port.

The Port was home to the United Fruit Company and imported innumerable amounts of Bananas from South America, and Union Oil and Standard Oil companies, which were vital to the growth of the country’s oil industry. It was also home to the Great White Fleet, the cornerstone of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick diplomacy. Due to its logistical, economical, and political prominence, the Port of Los Angeles was crucial to the United State’s development of the Panama Canal. During World War II, the Port was a valuable shipbuilding resource, making massive contributions to the war effort, and employing nearly 90,000 people.

Today, the Port of Los Angeles comprises of 7,500 acres of land and water along 43 miles of waterfront. It features 27 passenger, cargo terminals, and warehouse facilities that handle billions of dollars worth of freight each year. Today, the Port of Los Angeles is the busiest port in the United States by container volume and the 19th busiest port in the world.

In 2002, the Board of Harbor Commissioners for terminal and ship operations programs targeted at reducing polluting emissions from vessels and cargo handling equipment as a part of a new sustainability initiative. Their sustainability initiative can be summed up in this quote from the Port of Los Angeles website:

The Port of Los Angeles is committed to promoting responsible growth and supporting innovative development. Utilizing the tenets of sustainability, the Port works toward the best interests of the community, environment, and economy. These principles are practiced through integral considerations during planning, design and construction, and throughout operations and maintenance of Port facilities and structures.

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below, or check out our last installment in the series. 

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Port Story: Port of Houston

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While there has been trading along the gulf coast of Texas as long as anyone can remember, the official Port of Houston didn’t exist until the 20th century, making it one of the youngest ports in the world. Port of Houston would have never existed at all if it weren’t for Mother Nature.

In 1900, a massive hurricane hit the coast, becoming one of the worst natural disasters in American history. This convinced residents of Houston of the need for a deep-water port and President Woodrow Wilson officially opened the port to traffic as the World Port of Houston and Buffalo Bayou on November 10, 1914.

Port Houston was the first port to be built with federal funds and local matching funds, creating the requirement that every port in the United States since 1930 has had to meet. It was also the first port in the United States to see the first direct shipment of cotton to Europe and was the first port to meet ISO 14001 standards for environmental excellence, and the first port to be recertified to ISO 14001 standards.

Today, Port Houston is the busiest United States port regarding foreign tonnage and the second busiest port overall. It is a massive contributor to the Texas economy, with it providing over 1 million jobs in 2014 and having a statewide economic impact of $264.9 billion dollars. From Port Houston’s website: 

Port Houston’s economic activity helps keep Texas the nation’s top exporting state.  For the past 13 consecutive years, Texas has outpaced the rest of the country in exports.  In 2014, Texas exports totaled more than $289 billion, up from nearly $280 billion in 2013, according to annual trade data from the U.S. Department of Commerce.  The state’s exports outperformed overall U.S. exports, which only grew by 2.4 percent to $1.62 trillion in 2014 from $1.58 trillion in 2013.

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below, or check out our last installment in the series. 

Port Stories: Port of Savannah

Port Story- Savannah

Both the Port of Savannah and the colony of Georgia were founded in the winter of 1733 by the Englishman James Oglethorpe. In 1744, the first dock for ocean-going ships was constructed in Savannah. By the late 18th century, Savannah became a bustling port. From there, Agricultural products were sent abroad, and in return came goods from the old world. By 1876, imports and exports through Savannah totaled $70 million.

During World War II, Port of Savannah played a significant role in the war effort. The shipyard constructed a fleet of 88 ships that carried troops, arms, and supplies to U.S. and Allied forces in all theaters of the war. In 1945, the port was taken over by Georgia Port Authority, who operate the port today.

Today, Port of Savannah is the largest single container terminal in North America and the second busiest U.S. container exporter. The port contributes $84.1 billion in sales (9.6% of Georgia’s total sales) and accounts for 8.4% of Georgia’s total employment. The largest imports and exports are base metals used for commercial and industrial application.

Additionally, the Port of Savannah is one of the most efficient ports in the world.

The deep water ports are perfectly positioned to handle a growing export market. Georgia Ports Authority is committed to conducting port operations in an efficient and environmentally respectful manner. We continually improve our operations and facilities with these goals in mind. See what we are doing around the Port to protect and preserve the surrounding wetlands, to reduce emissions and to help our community. —gaports.com

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below, or check out our last installment in the series. 

Earth Day 2017

Happy Earth Day! We’re excited to celebrate another year on this beautiful planet.

One of the central values of Green Worldwide is respect for our planet and our environment. Sustainable business practices are achievable goals for our clients and for Green. The Green Worldwide team is dedicated to seeking out and implementing innovative and eco-friendly transportation solutions.

Green Worldwide is proud to celebrate this Earth Day as a member of the United Nation’s Global Compact. There are ten principles of the Compact, and principles seven through nine focus on the environment:

Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;

Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and

Principle 9: encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Check out our video celebrating April 22nd

Or last year’s video!

For more information on the United Nations Global Compact, visit unglobalcompact.org or check out our previous blog post on our membership. To learn more about our commitment to the environment, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story: Port Tampa Bay

Port Story- Tampa BayWe tend to focus on Miami and Jacksonville for international trade coming out of Florida, thinking of them as the only gateway to Central and South America. However, there is another port in Florida that is a primary resource for international trade. Port Tampa Bay ranks 16th in the United States by tonnage in domestic trade, 32nd in foreign trade, and 22nd in total trade. It is the largest, most diversified port in Florida, has an economic impact of more than $15.1 billion, and supports over 80,000 jobs.

Tampa Bay was first mapped by Spanish explorers in the 16th century. The port was a safe, warm-water harbor that made it an ideal location for trade between the then-Spanish colony and Cuba. This trade included Cattle, hide, lumber, and more. After the United States had acquired Florida from Spain, the port flourished. New industry and resources led to massive growth in the 1800s. By 1929, a 27-foot channel was in place. The port was a major resource for the United States during World War II, and today the Port is maintained by Port Tampa Bay, Port Authority, and the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

The Tampa seaport, Florida’s largest by acreage, already handles cargo bound for Cuba under waivers to the embargo that allows sales of U.S. agricultural products. In the past 5 years, the seaport has sent about 70.000 tons of freight to Cuba, mostly fertilizer. Other trade lanes of the port include the Caribbean Islands, Central America, and Asia. Port Tampa Bay handles a variety of different industries, such as furniture, electronics, automobiles, construction, and foodstuff. It additionally sees over 900,000 commercial passengers a year in association with various cruise lines.

For more information on Green Worldwide and freight forwarding, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Port Story is a new series detailing the history and operations of trade ports across the United States and the world. Want to see a port that interests you? Let us know in the comments below!

Happy New Year!

We hope that you and yours had a safe and happy holiday season! To celebrate the new year, we created a year-in-review video to look back on all the growth that took place during 2016.

We could only highlight a few events in the video, but from joining Twitter to opening our eighth branch in Denver, Colorado, it certainly was a busy year for Green Worldwide Shipping. We hope you enjoy the video, and we look forward to another busy year!

For more information about our company and our values, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

Green Worldwide is Ahead of the Curve

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On November 14, 2016, The Seattle Times posted an article entitled, “Amazon to Drop Dreaded Stack-ranking Performance Reviews.” The article stated that Amazon was completely changing their annual performance review process in order to compete with other large tech companies for employee talent.  The company “vowed” to make employee evaluations more focused on achievements instead of how an employee looks compared with other colleagues.  This announcement comes more than a year after a piece was published on the ranking system in the New York Times. That article showed that stack-ranking is a factor in a “bruising” work culture.

None of this was news for the President of Green Worldwide Shipping, LLC, Thomas Jorgensen.  In 2012, Jorgensen decided that he wanted his management to focus on the cornerstones of the company:

  • Respect
  • Dedication
  • Customer service second to none
  • Positive and healthy work environment
  • Long term relationships
  • Personal and professional growth
  • Ethics and integrity
  • Our people

At Green Worldwide, what companies generally refer to as “Performance Reviews,” were to be called “Employee Development Meetings/Discussions.” The discussion was to be about the employee and the employee’s relationship to the company and the job. The goal of this change was to motivate, encourage, inform, and most importantly to listen to what the employee has to say in terms of wellbeing, feedback, and plans for the future.  The grading system was removed and was replaced with a dialogue between manager and employee.

Since Jorgensen’s change in 2012, Green Worldwide has a higher employee retention rate, better communication between management and employees, and a more relaxed and open work environment. This program is proof that Green Worldwide Shipping, LLC is a cut above the rest.

For more information about our company and our values, visit our website, or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.